Revealed: The two foods your baby should eat in their first year to prevent

  • The Medical Journal of Australia released its latest set of guidelines on Monday 
  • Doctors recommend including egg and peanuts in a baby’s diet by 12 months 
  • Dr Preeti Joshi suggested parents continue feeding the foods twice weekly 
  • Professor John Ziegler from Sydney Children’s Hospital supported the claims  

We live in a world where food allergies are on the rise.

And in the latest Medical Journal of Australia, published this week, doctors recommended parents introduce two foods in a baby’s first year to prevent allergies.

Dr Preeti Joshi suggested incorporating eggs and peanuts into a baby’s diet by 12 months, but not before four months. 

Clinical associate professor and immunologist Richard Loh agreed with the recommendations in an interview with FEMAIL on Monday.  

Revealed: Health experts have revealed the two foods your baby should eat in their first year to prevent allergies

Revealed: Health experts have revealed the two foods your baby should eat in their first year to prevent allergies

The Australasia Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy released their latest recommendations in the Medical Journal of Australia, published Monday.  

Author Dr Preeti Joshi, recommended parents introduce eggs and peanuts into a baby’s diet by 12 months, but not before four months.

In the paper, Dr Joshi suggested parents continue feeding their baby eggs and peanuts twice weekly.

Dr Joshi said there’s ‘moderate evidence’ suggesting babies who regularly consumed peanuts could reduce the risk of developing an allergy in their later years. 

Eggs and peanuts: In the Medical Journal of Australia, published on Monday, author Dr Preeti Joshi recommended parents introduce eggs and peanuts into a baby's diet by 12 months 

Eggs and peanuts: In the Medical Journal of Australia, published on Monday, author Dr Preeti Joshi recommended parents introduce eggs and peanuts into a baby’s diet by 12 months 

She suggested parents consult their doctor should they be wary of feeding their babies peanuts, which are often a common food allergy in children.   

Clinical associate professor and immunologist Richard Loh told FEMAIL on Monday that it’s ‘a valid point’ by parents to feel conflicted.

’10 years ago research suggested peanuts should be introduced by the three-year mark, so it’s a valid point for parents to feel conflicted by this new information,’ Mr Loh said.

‘The Medical Journal of Australia is produced for GP’s in order for them to become equipped with knowledge in talking to patients about their concerns. Any parent who is cautious should consult with their doctor,’ he continued.   

‘There’s so much information out on the internet, so it’s normal to feel conflicted.’